Dataset: LFS - Average Annual Hours Worked
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Hours
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The series on annual hours actually worked per person in total employment presented in this table for all 34 OECD countries are consistent with the series retained for the calculation of productivity measures in the OECD Productivity database (www.oecd.org/statistics/productivity/compendium). However, there may be some differences for some countries given that the main purpose of the latter database is to report data series on labour input (i.e. total hours worked) and also because the updating of databases occur at different moments of the year.

Hours actually worked per person in employment are according to National Accounts concepts for 25 countries: Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Korea, Latvia, Luxembourg,  the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Turkey. Secretariat estimates for Lithuania for annual hours worked are based on the European Labour Force Survey as are estimates for dependent employees for Austria, Estonia, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Portugal and the Slovak Republic. For the remaining countries, the sources and methodologies are the same as those presented in the previous edition of the OECD Employment Outlook, as are estimates reported for dependent employment for 29 OECD countries. The table also includes labour force survey based estimates for Costa Rica and the Russian Federation.

For further details and country specific notes see: www.oecd.org/employment/outlook and www.oecd.org/employment/emp/ANNUAL-HOURS-WORKED.pdf. For details on the international comparability of annual hours, see www.oecd.org/employment/emp/International-comparability-of-OECD-measures-of-annual-hours-worked.pdf

Dataset: LFS - Average Annual Hours WorkedContact person/organisation

els.contact@oecd.org

Unit of measure usedHoursStatistical population

The concept used is the total number of hours worked over the year divided by the average number of people in employment. The data are intended for comparisons of trends over time; they are unsuitable for comparisons of the level of average annual hours of work for a given year, because of differences in their sources.&nbsp; Part-time workers are covered as well as full-time workers.

Geographic coverage

In order to facilitate analysis and comparisons over time, historical data for OECD members have been provided over as long a period as possible, often even before a country became a member of the Organisation. Information on the membership dates of all OECD countries can be found at OECD Ratification Dates

OECD Ratification Dateshttp://www.oecd.org/about/membersandpartners/list-oecd-member-countries.htm
Key statistical concept

The series on annual hours actually worked per person in total employment presented in this table for all 34 OECD countries are consistent with the series retained for the calculation of productivity measures in the OECD Productivity database (www.oecd.org/statistics/productivity/compendium). However, there may be some differences for some countries given that the main purpose of the latter database is to report data series on labour input (i.e. total hours worked) and also because the updating of databases occur at different moments of the year.

Hours actually worked per person in employment are according to National Accounts concepts for 25 countries: Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Korea, Latvia, Luxembourg,  the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Turkey. Secretariat estimates for Lithuania for annual hours worked are based on the European Labour Force Survey as are estimates for dependent employees for Austria, Estonia, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Portugal and the Slovak Republic. For the remaining countries, the sources and methodologies are the same as those presented in the previous edition of the OECD Employment Outlook, as are estimates reported for dependent employment for 29 OECD countries. The table also includes labour force survey based estimates for Costa Rica and the Russian Federation.

For further details and country specific notes see: www.oecd.org/employment/outlook and www.oecd.org/employment/emp/ANNUAL-HOURS-WORKED.pdf. For details on the international comparability of annual hours, see www.oecd.org/employment/emp/International-comparability-of-OECD-measures-of-annual-hours-worked.pdf