Monthly Monetary and Financial Statistics (MEI)
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24/10/2017 01:00:07
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The Financial Statistics dataset contains predominantly monthly statistics, and associated statistical methodological information, for the 35 OECD member countries and some selected other countries.

The dataset itself contains financial statistics on 4 separate subjects: Monetary Aggregates, Interest Rates, Exchange Rates, and Share Prices. The data series presented within these subjects have been chosen as the most relevant financial statistics for which comparable data across countries is available. In all cases a lot of effort has been made to ensure that the data are internationally comparable across all countries presented and that all the subjects have good historical time-series’ data to aid with analysis. All data are available monthly, and are presented as either an index (where the year 2010 is the base year) or as a level depending on which measure is seen as the most appropriate and/or useful in the economic analysis context.
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Financial Indicators aim to capture in quantitative terms an important but heterogeneous and fast evolving area. Key factors driving this change are:
• globalisation of the financial markets;
• maturing of national financial markets and therefore the structure of these markets required to service their needs;
• increased sophistication of the actors in these markets;
• rapid technological change; and,
• evolving regulatory frameworks.
Financial institutions react and adapt to these conditions by changing their strategies; by specialising, by diversifying or concentrating their activities, and by extending through mergers and acquisitions. As a consequence, there is almost constant evolution in the institutional structures in which financial markets operate.
Monthly Monetary and Financial Statistics (MEI)Date last updated
24/10/2017 01:00:07
Contact person
OECD statistics contact: stat.contact@oecd.org

http://www.oecd.org/std
Key statistical concept
The Financial Statistics dataset contains predominantly monthly statistics, and associated statistical methodological information, for the 35 OECD member countries and some selected other countries.

The dataset itself contains financial statistics on 4 separate subjects: Monetary Aggregates, Interest Rates, Exchange Rates, and Share Prices. The data series presented within these subjects have been chosen as the most relevant financial statistics for which comparable data across countries is available. In all cases a lot of effort has been made to ensure that the data are internationally comparable across all countries presented and that all the subjects have good historical time-series’ data to aid with analysis. All data are available monthly, and are presented as either an index (where the year 2010 is the base year) or as a level depending on which measure is seen as the most appropriate and/or useful in the economic analysis context.
Recommended uses and limitations
Financial Indicators aim to capture in quantitative terms an important but heterogeneous and fast evolving area. Key factors driving this change are:
• globalisation of the financial markets;
• maturing of national financial markets and therefore the structure of these markets required to service their needs;
• increased sophistication of the actors in these markets;
• rapid technological change; and,
• evolving regulatory frameworks.
Financial institutions react and adapt to these conditions by changing their strategies; by specialising, by diversifying or concentrating their activities, and by extending through mergers and acquisitions. As a consequence, there is almost constant evolution in the institutional structures in which financial markets operate.