Africa's Development Dynamics - Statistical Annex
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For more information about the Statistical Annex, please contact DEVEuropeMiddle-EastAfricaTeam@oecd.org.
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Data was obtained from various sources, including harmonised data sets of annual national data from reputable international institutions, as well as some indicators that were calculated by researchers working on the publication. The statistical annex will be updated regularly in order to incorporate the addition of more recent figures, and updates and corrections in external data sources.
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In addition to country-level data, aggregated figures are calculated for the following country groups:
- The five African Union regions (as defined by the Abuja Treaty)
- Africa, Asia, Latin America and Caribbean, and the World
- Resource-rich countries
Countries that obtain a significant fraction of their GDP from underground natural-resource extraction are referred to as “resource-rich”. These resource endowments of these countries can have major implications for economic, political, and social development. Countries defined as resource-rich in this report were identified as those for whom over 10% of GDP came from underground natural resource for at least 5 of the previous 10 years.
- Income level
The World Bank divides the countries of the world into four categories based on GNI per capita in 2016, using their Atlas Method(1): low-income countries, lower middle-income countries, upper middle-income countries, and high-income countries.
- Geographic access
The report provides a breakdown between countries that are landlocked, countries that have a portion of coastline, and island nations. Gaining access to world trade can be complicated by a country’s access to the ocean or lack thereof, while island nations have been shown to have different development patterns than other coastal nations. In addition to this three-way breakdown of countries, this report provides data on countries deemed “Landlocked developing countries (LLDC)” and “Small Island Developing States (SIDS)” by the UN Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS)(2) .
- Least-developed countries(3)
In addition to defining countries as LLDC and SIDS, the UN-OHRLLS also classifies some countries as “Least Developed Countries (LDC)” as of 1 July 2018. This categorisation of countries was officially established in 1971, by the UN General Assembly, and represents countries that face low levels of socio-economic development. Countries are designated as LDC countries based on income criteria, the health and education of their populations, and their economic vulnerability.
- Fragile States and Extremely fragile states (4)
Countries classified as "fragile states" and "extremely fragile states" in the States of Fragility 2018 report produced by the OECD.
- Regional Economic Communities (5)
Eight regional economic communities of African nations recognized by the African Union. ASEAN, a grouping of Asian countries, Mercosur, a grouping of Latin American communities, and the countries of the European Union are added for comparison.

Notes
1. Please see http://datahelpdesk.worldbank.org/knowledgebase/articles/378832-what-is-theworld-bank-atlas-method.
2. Please see http://unohrlls.org for more information.
3. Please see http://unohrlls.org/about-ldcs/criteria-for-ldcs for more information.
4. Please see http://www.oecd.org/dac/states-of-fragility-2018-9789264302075-en.htm for information.
5. Please see https://au.int/en/organs/recs for more information.
Africa's Development Dynamics - Statistical AnnexContact person/organisation
For more information about the Statistical Annex, please contact DEVEuropeMiddle-EastAfricaTeam@oecd.org.
https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-enhttps://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-enSource Periodicity
Data was obtained from various sources, including harmonised data sets of annual national data from reputable international institutions, as well as some indicators that were calculated by researchers working on the publication. The statistical annex will be updated regularly in order to incorporate the addition of more recent figures, and updates and corrections in external data sources.
https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-enhttps://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-enReference period
The figures presented here represent a snapshot of figures for the most recent years. More complete time series for the same indicators can be found online through the OECD's online statistical portal at https://stats.oecd.org/ and clicking on "Development", followed by "Africa's Development Dynamics" on the menu. Figures are presented on a national basis only for African countries for which data is available.
https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-enhttps://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-en
Date last updated
31/10/2018
Item coverage
The Statistical Annex to the annual Africa's Development Dynamics (AFDD) report is a collection of indicators that were gathered and analysed while conducting the research that went into the report. These data are available online for free viewing or download at www.oecd.org/development/africa-s-development-dynamics-2018-9789264302501-en.htm, a bilingual website which links to the electronic version of the Africa's Development Dynamics book in both English and French.
https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-enhttps://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-en
Key statistical concept
All indicators that were chosen for the annex provide national data figures for all or nearly all African countries, as well as most countries in the rest of the world. These choices were made in order to allow for both comparisons between African countries as well as comparisons with groups of similar countries outside of Africa that could serve as benchmarks. These data will serve to give context to the analyses presented in the report and allow readers to investigate the underlying data in more depth, and as time passes, for readers to investigate data that is more current than what is found in the report.
https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-enhttps://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-en
Aggregation and consolidation
In addition to country-level data, aggregated figures are calculated for the following country groups:
- The five African Union regions (as defined by the Abuja Treaty)
- Africa, Asia, Latin America and Caribbean, and the World
- Resource-rich countries
Countries that obtain a significant fraction of their GDP from underground natural-resource extraction are referred to as “resource-rich”. These resource endowments of these countries can have major implications for economic, political, and social development. Countries defined as resource-rich in this report were identified as those for whom over 10% of GDP came from underground natural resource for at least 5 of the previous 10 years.
- Income level
The World Bank divides the countries of the world into four categories based on GNI per capita in 2016, using their Atlas Method(1): low-income countries, lower middle-income countries, upper middle-income countries, and high-income countries.
- Geographic access
The report provides a breakdown between countries that are landlocked, countries that have a portion of coastline, and island nations. Gaining access to world trade can be complicated by a country’s access to the ocean or lack thereof, while island nations have been shown to have different development patterns than other coastal nations. In addition to this three-way breakdown of countries, this report provides data on countries deemed “Landlocked developing countries (LLDC)” and “Small Island Developing States (SIDS)” by the UN Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS)(2) .
- Least-developed countries(3)
In addition to defining countries as LLDC and SIDS, the UN-OHRLLS also classifies some countries as “Least Developed Countries (LDC)” as of 1 July 2018. This categorisation of countries was officially established in 1971, by the UN General Assembly, and represents countries that face low levels of socio-economic development. Countries are designated as LDC countries based on income criteria, the health and education of their populations, and their economic vulnerability.
- Fragile States and Extremely fragile states (4)
Countries classified as "fragile states" and "extremely fragile states" in the States of Fragility 2018 report produced by the OECD.
- Regional Economic Communities (5)
Eight regional economic communities of African nations recognized by the African Union. ASEAN, a grouping of Asian countries, Mercosur, a grouping of Latin American communities, and the countries of the European Union are added for comparison.

Notes
1. Please see http://datahelpdesk.worldbank.org/knowledgebase/articles/378832-what-is-theworld-bank-atlas-method.
2. Please see http://unohrlls.org for more information.
3. Please see http://unohrlls.org/about-ldcs/criteria-for-ldcs for more information.
4. Please see http://www.oecd.org/dac/states-of-fragility-2018-9789264302075-en.htm for information.
5. Please see https://au.int/en/organs/recs for more information.
https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-enhttps://doi.org/10.1787/9789264302501-en