Adult education and learning
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The data presented in this table are addressing adult education and learning by looking at the following indicators based on the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC): participation in formal and/or non-formal education, by literacy proficiency ; participation in adult education, by type of education; willingness to participate in formal and/or non-formal education, barriers to participation; participation in formal and/or non-formal education, by whether there are young children in the household; participation in formal and/or non-formal education, by participation in volunteering activities; participation of native- and foreign-born adults in formal and/or non-formal education by gender and educational attainment; participation of native- and foreign-born adults in formal and/or non-formal education by labour force status.

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Further detail as to the methodology used during the data collection for each indicator, the references to the sources and the specific notes for each country are available in:

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Key statistical concepts, definitions and methodologies underlying the indicators are available in the:

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Data are not diplayed when the sample size for numerator is below 3 and when the sample size for denominator is below 30.

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When interpreting the results and the differences between groups a special attention should be given to the standard errors and the confidence interval.

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The statistical estimates presented in this table are based on samples of adults, rather than values that could be calculated if every person in the target population in every country had answered every question. Therefore, each estimate has a degree of uncertainty associated with sampling and measurement error, which can be expressed as a standard error. The use of confidence intervals provides a way to make inferences about the population means and proportions in a manner that reflects the uncertainty associated with the sample estimates. In this table, there is one column with the heading “Value”, which indicates the average percentage or mean, and a column with the heading “SE”, which indicates the standard error. Given the survey method, there is a sampling uncertainty in the percentages or means of twice the standard error. For example, for the values: % = 10 and S.E. = 2.6, 10% has an uncertainty zone of twice (1.96) the standard error of 2.6, assuming an error risk of 5%. Thus, the true percentage would probably (error risk of 5%) be somewhere between 5% and 15% (“confidence interval”). The confidence interval is calculated as: % +/– 1.96 * S.E., i.e. for the previous example, 5% = 10% – 1.96 * 2.6 and 15% = 10% + 1.96 * 2.6.

Adult education and learningAbstract

The data presented in this table are addressing adult education and learning by looking at the following indicators based on the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC): participation in formal and/or non-formal education, by literacy proficiency ; participation in adult education, by type of education; willingness to participate in formal and/or non-formal education, barriers to participation; participation in formal and/or non-formal education, by whether there are young children in the household; participation in formal and/or non-formal education, by participation in volunteering activities; participation of native- and foreign-born adults in formal and/or non-formal education by gender and educational attainment; participation of native- and foreign-born adults in formal and/or non-formal education by labour force status.

Data source(s) used

Data are coming from the Survey of Adult Skills, a product of the OECD Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC)

Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC)http://www.oecd.org/skills/piaac/
Contact person

markus.schwabe@oecd.org - Simon.Normandeau@oecd.org or click:

Markus SCHWABEmarkus.schwabe@oecd.orgSimon NORMANDEAUmailto:Simon.Normandeau@oecd.org
Other data characteristics

Further detail as to the methodology used during the data collection for each indicator, the references to the sources and the specific notes for each country are available in:

Annex 3 - Education at a Glancehttps://doi.org/10.1787/eag-2018-36-en
Key statistical concept

Key statistical concepts, definitions and methodologies underlying the indicators are available in the:

OECD Handbook for Internationally Comparative Education Statisticshttps://doi.org/10.1787/9789264304444-en
Classification(s) used

Detailed presentation and explanation of the ISCED 2011 classification is available in :

OECD Handbook for Internationally Comparative Education Statisticshttps://doi.org/10.1787/9789264304444-en
Other manipulations

Data are not diplayed when the sample size for numerator is below 3 and when the sample size for denominator is below 30.

Recommended uses and limitations

The statistical estimates presented in this table are based on samples of adults, rather than values that could be calculated if every person in the target population in every country had answered every question. Therefore, each estimate has a degree of uncertainty associated with sampling and measurement error, which can be expressed as a standard error. The use of confidence intervals provides a way to make inferences about the population means and proportions in a manner that reflects the uncertainty associated with the sample estimates. In this table, there is one column with the heading “Value”, which indicates the average percentage or mean, and a column with the heading “SE”, which indicates the standard error. Given the survey method, there is a sampling uncertainty in the percentages or means of twice the standard error. For example, for the values: % = 10 and S.E. = 2.6, 10% has an uncertainty zone of twice (1.96) the standard error of 2.6, assuming an error risk of 5%. Thus, the true percentage would probably (error risk of 5%) be somewhere between 5% and 15% (“confidence interval”). The confidence interval is calculated as: % +/– 1.96 * S.E., i.e. for the previous example, 5% = 10% – 1.96 * 2.6 and 15% = 10% + 1.96 * 2.6.

Quality comments

When interpreting the results and the differences between groups a special attention should be given to the standard errors and the confidence interval.

Other comments

Search how your country compares:

GPS Country profilehttp://gpseducation.oecd.org/CountryProfileGPS Explore datahttp://gpseducation.oecd.org/IndicatorExplorer?query=14&indicators=A072*A247*B033*A012*C005*A013*A014*A003*A004*A005*A071*A073*A080*A081*A082*A112*A151*A110*A111*A076*A079*A224*A230*A141*A147*C020*C006*C007*A244*C002*D011*D012*A030*A210*A213*A216*A219*A221*A222*A223*C015*A235*C003*A248*A249*B002*B003*B004*B005*B027*B028*B029*B057*B058*B030*B046*D019*D018*D014*D015*D013*D021*D022*D020*D024*D025*D026*D031*D032*D033