Fossil Fuel Support - CZE
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CZECH REPUBLIC: GENERAL METADATA
Data documentation
General notes
The fiscal year in the Czech Republic coincides with the calendar year.
Consumer support estimates were provided directly by the Ministry of Environment, the Ministry of Finance, and the Ministry of Industry and Trade. Measures pertaining to the restructuring of the country’s coal-mining industry and associated environmental liabilities are taken from a study included in the Mineral Commodity Summaries of the Czech Republic (Czech Geological Survey - Geofond, 2010) that was published by the Ministry of Industry and Trade: "Eliminating negative consequences of mining in the Czech Republic" - main methods and financial resources" (Kaštovský and Platzek, 2010).
Notes relating to the General Services Support Estimate
Since 1991, the Czech Republic has not supported the production or consumption of coal. The state retains, however, an obligation to deal with the social, health, and environmental liabilities associated with past mining activity. The government transferred these obligations to two state-owned enterprises, DIAMO, s.p. and Palivový kombinát Ústí, s.p., which acquired the assets of the closed mining companies. These state-owned enterprises receive government subsidies for the activities they carry out. Since measures financed through these subsidy payments do not act to increase current production or consumption of coal, they are all allocated to the GSSE.
Restructuring the coal-mining industry and remediating the negative environmental consequences of mining are conducted in several different ways and using several different financial resources (Kaštovský and Platzek, 2010). Besides the measures reported in this inventory, mining companies have since 1994 been required to set up two reserve funds: a financial reserve for remediation and reclamation of all plots of land affected by mining, and a financial reserve for alleviating material damage caused by mining (e.g. land subsidence).

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OECD (2018), OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018, Paris.

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Nov-17

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Annual

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Units
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Czech koruna

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Indicator

PSE: Producer Support Estimate

GSSE: General Services Support Estimate

CSE: Consumer Support Estimate

Stage

EXTRACT: Extraction or mining stage

TRANS: Transportation of fossil fuels (e.g., through pipelines)

REFIN: Refining or processing stage

GENER: Use of fossil fuels in ectricity generation

INDUS: Use of fossil fuels in the industrial sector

END: Other end uses of fossil fuels

Statutory or Formal Incidence

consumption: Direct consumption

returns: Output Returns

income: Enterprise Income

inputs: Cost of Intermediate Inputs

labour: Labour

land: Land and natural resources

capital: Capital

knowledge: Knowledge

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Users of tax expenditure estimates should bear in mind that the Inventory records tax expenditures as estimates of revenue that is foregone due to a particular feature of the tax system that reduces or postpones tax relative to a jurisdiction’s benchmark tax system, to the benefit of fossil fuels. Hence, (i) tax expenditure estimates could increase either because of greater concessions, relative to the benchmark tax treatment, or because of a raise in the benchmark itself; (ii) international comparison of tax expenditures could be misleading, due to country-specific benchmark tax treatments.

Fossil Fuel Support - CZEAbstract

CZECH REPUBLIC: GENERAL METADATA
Data documentation
General notes
The fiscal year in the Czech Republic coincides with the calendar year.
Consumer support estimates were provided directly by the Ministry of Environment, the Ministry of Finance, and the Ministry of Industry and Trade. Measures pertaining to the restructuring of the country’s coal-mining industry and associated environmental liabilities are taken from a study included in the Mineral Commodity Summaries of the Czech Republic (Czech Geological Survey - Geofond, 2010) that was published by the Ministry of Industry and Trade: "Eliminating negative consequences of mining in the Czech Republic" - main methods and financial resources" (Kaštovský and Platzek, 2010).
Notes relating to the General Services Support Estimate
Since 1991, the Czech Republic has not supported the production or consumption of coal. The state retains, however, an obligation to deal with the social, health, and environmental liabilities associated with past mining activity. The government transferred these obligations to two state-owned enterprises, DIAMO, s.p. and Palivový kombinát Ústí, s.p., which acquired the assets of the closed mining companies. These state-owned enterprises receive government subsidies for the activities they carry out. Since measures financed through these subsidy payments do not act to increase current production or consumption of coal, they are all allocated to the GSSE.
Restructuring the coal-mining industry and remediating the negative environmental consequences of mining are conducted in several different ways and using several different financial resources (Kaštovský and Platzek, 2010). Besides the measures reported in this inventory, mining companies have since 1994 been required to set up two reserve funds: a financial reserve for remediation and reclamation of all plots of land affected by mining, and a financial reserve for alleviating material damage caused by mining (e.g. land subsidence).

Country notehttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=fdb82750-aae6-473d-92e2-dffcdb832618Country sourceshttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=3d737bb8-dfc0-4cd9-bd8b-458bc39ba245
Contact person/organisation

ffs.contact@oecd.orgffs.contact@oecd.orgName of collection/source

OECD (2018), OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018, Paris.

Unit of measure used

Czech koruna

Power codeUnitsPeriodicity

Annual

Date last updated

Nov-17

Key statistical concept

Indicator

PSE: Producer Support Estimate

GSSE: General Services Support Estimate

CSE: Consumer Support Estimate

Stage

EXTRACT: Extraction or mining stage

TRANS: Transportation of fossil fuels (e.g., through pipelines)

REFIN: Refining or processing stage

GENER: Use of fossil fuels in ectricity generation

INDUS: Use of fossil fuels in the industrial sector

END: Other end uses of fossil fuels

Statutory or Formal Incidence

consumption: Direct consumption

returns: Output Returns

income: Enterprise Income

inputs: Cost of Intermediate Inputs

labour: Labour

land: Land and natural resources

capital: Capital

knowledge: Knowledge

Recommended uses and limitations

Users of tax expenditure estimates should bear in mind that the Inventory records tax expenditures as estimates of revenue that is foregone due to a particular feature of the tax system that reduces or postpones tax relative to a jurisdiction’s benchmark tax system, to the benefit of fossil fuels. Hence, (i) tax expenditure estimates could increase either because of greater concessions, relative to the benchmark tax treatment, or because of a raise in the benchmark itself; (ii) international comparison of tax expenditures could be misleading, due to country-specific benchmark tax treatments.

Other comments

OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264286061-en