Fossil Fuel Support - DEU
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GERMANY: GENERAL METADATA
Data documentation
The fiscal year in Germany coincides with the calendar year. Following OECD convention, amounts prior to 1999 are expressed as "euro-fixed series", in which the fixed EMU conversion rate (EUR 1 EUR = DEM 1.956) was applied to data initially expressed in the Deutsche Mark (DEM). In a few cases [1], the conversion into EUR was already made in official government documents.
Germany being a federal country, the data also cover the states (Länder) that are still producing hard coal (North Rhine Westphalia, NW) and those that were producing hard coal until recently (Saarland, SR). Also included are payments for the rehabilitation of lignite-mining sites in eastern Germany (see DEU_dt_13) made by the Federal Government and the states of Saxony (SN), Brandenburg (BR), Saxony Anhalt (ST), and Thüringen (TH).
Producer Support Estimate
Hard-coal mining in Germany has traditionally attracted support for geological, historical, and political reasons. Since production of hard coal remains largely uneconomic, most mines are due to close by 2018 when government support to the industry is planned to be removed.
Over the years, production of hard coal has been scaled back through numerous government initiatives. In the 1990s, the industry underwent various capacity-adjustment plans. Funding for these programmes was usually provided jointly by the coal-mining Land and the Federal Government, with the former accounting for about two-thirds of total payments.
Hard-coal production has generally been supported through a combination of debt-relief schemes, mining-royalty concessions, reduced pension contributions for miners and provisions guaranteeing demand for the hard coal produced (see Combined Aids in North Rhine-Westphalia).
In accordance with the EU’s state-aid rules, the Federal Government does not provide any more assistance to coal-mining under article 5-3 (current production aid). In preparation for the closure of mines, most of the support is now provided in the form of early-retirement funding for coal miners.
Footnotes
[1] This applies to the support measures for which the source is Landtag des Saarlandes (2005).


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OECD (2018), OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018, Paris.

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Nov-17

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Annual

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Units
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Euro

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Indicator

PSE: Producer Support Estimate

GSSE: General Services Support Estimate

CSE: Consumer Support Estimate

Stage

EXTRACT: Extraction or mining stage

TRANS: Transportation of fossil fuels (e.g., through pipelines)

REFIN: Refining or processing stage

GENER: Use of fossil fuels in ectricity generation

INDUS: Use of fossil fuels in the industrial sector

END: Other end uses of fossil fuels

Statutory or Formal Incidence

consumption: Direct consumption

returns: Output Returns

income: Enterprise Income

inputs: Cost of Intermediate Inputs

labour: Labour

land: Land and natural resources

capital: Capital

knowledge: Knowledge

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Users of tax expenditure estimates should bear in mind that the Inventory records tax expenditures as estimates of revenue that is foregone due to a particular feature of the tax system that reduces or postpones tax relative to a jurisdiction’s benchmark tax system, to the benefit of fossil fuels. Hence, (i) tax expenditure estimates could increase either because of greater concessions, relative to the benchmark tax treatment, or because of a raise in the benchmark itself; (ii) international comparison of tax expenditures could be misleading, due to country-specific benchmark tax treatments.

Fossil Fuel Support - DEUAbstract

GERMANY: GENERAL METADATA
Data documentation
The fiscal year in Germany coincides with the calendar year. Following OECD convention, amounts prior to 1999 are expressed as "euro-fixed series", in which the fixed EMU conversion rate (EUR 1 EUR = DEM 1.956) was applied to data initially expressed in the Deutsche Mark (DEM). In a few cases [1], the conversion into EUR was already made in official government documents.
Germany being a federal country, the data also cover the states (Länder) that are still producing hard coal (North Rhine Westphalia, NW) and those that were producing hard coal until recently (Saarland, SR). Also included are payments for the rehabilitation of lignite-mining sites in eastern Germany (see DEU_dt_13) made by the Federal Government and the states of Saxony (SN), Brandenburg (BR), Saxony Anhalt (ST), and Thüringen (TH).
Producer Support Estimate
Hard-coal mining in Germany has traditionally attracted support for geological, historical, and political reasons. Since production of hard coal remains largely uneconomic, most mines are due to close by 2018 when government support to the industry is planned to be removed.
Over the years, production of hard coal has been scaled back through numerous government initiatives. In the 1990s, the industry underwent various capacity-adjustment plans. Funding for these programmes was usually provided jointly by the coal-mining Land and the Federal Government, with the former accounting for about two-thirds of total payments.
Hard-coal production has generally been supported through a combination of debt-relief schemes, mining-royalty concessions, reduced pension contributions for miners and provisions guaranteeing demand for the hard coal produced (see Combined Aids in North Rhine-Westphalia).
In accordance with the EU’s state-aid rules, the Federal Government does not provide any more assistance to coal-mining under article 5-3 (current production aid). In preparation for the closure of mines, most of the support is now provided in the form of early-retirement funding for coal miners.
Footnotes
[1] This applies to the support measures for which the source is Landtag des Saarlandes (2005).


Country notehttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=8553c54e-4aff-4a89-9edc-4e57392902ddCountry sourceshttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=61d349f8-a0d6-4e7c-affd-e049372b3b41
Contact person/organisation

ffs.contact@oecd.orgffs.contact@oecd.orgName of collection/source

OECD (2018), OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018, Paris.

Unit of measure used

Euro

Power codeUnitsPeriodicity

Annual

Date last updated

Nov-17

Key statistical concept

Indicator

PSE: Producer Support Estimate

GSSE: General Services Support Estimate

CSE: Consumer Support Estimate

Stage

EXTRACT: Extraction or mining stage

TRANS: Transportation of fossil fuels (e.g., through pipelines)

REFIN: Refining or processing stage

GENER: Use of fossil fuels in ectricity generation

INDUS: Use of fossil fuels in the industrial sector

END: Other end uses of fossil fuels

Statutory or Formal Incidence

consumption: Direct consumption

returns: Output Returns

income: Enterprise Income

inputs: Cost of Intermediate Inputs

labour: Labour

land: Land and natural resources

capital: Capital

knowledge: Knowledge

Recommended uses and limitations

Users of tax expenditure estimates should bear in mind that the Inventory records tax expenditures as estimates of revenue that is foregone due to a particular feature of the tax system that reduces or postpones tax relative to a jurisdiction’s benchmark tax system, to the benefit of fossil fuels. Hence, (i) tax expenditure estimates could increase either because of greater concessions, relative to the benchmark tax treatment, or because of a raise in the benchmark itself; (ii) international comparison of tax expenditures could be misleading, due to country-specific benchmark tax treatments.

Other comments

OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264286061-en