Fossil Fuel Support - ISR
< < >-< OECD.Stat
Open all groups and itemsClose all groups and itemsSend link via emailPrintOpen in stand alone windowClose this window
Click to expand Database Specific
Click to collapse Database Specific
Click to expand Abstract
Click to collapse Abstract

ISRAEL: GENERAL METADATA
Data documentation
General notes
Israel’s fiscal year coincides with the calendar year.
Producer Support Estimate
The oil and gas industry in Israel is regulated by a system of fees, royalty payments and tax deductions developed in the 1950s. The fiscal provisions that are unique to the oil and gas industry are the Oil Law (1952), Oil Regulations (1953), Income Tax Ordinance (1961) and some parts of the income tax legislation, especially the Deductions from the Income of Holders of Oil Rights (1956) and the Rules for Calculating Tax for the Holding and Sale of Participation Units in an Oil Exploration Partnership (1988).
Israel started producing natural gas in 2004. As this is a relatively recent development, the issues of producer taxation and royalty payments are currently under review by the government (Knesset), the Ministry of Finance and participants representing the civil society. In April 2010, the Minister of Finance appointed a committee to examine the fiscal framework for the oil and gas resources in Israel, headed by Professor Eytan Sheshinski. The Sheshinski Committee submitted its final conclusions in January 2011. It recommended that the 12.5% rate of royalty payments should remain unchanged since increasing it could have a negative impact on the development of relatively less profitable gas fields. The depletion deduction, however, should be cancelled as it leads to a considerable reduction of the amount of taxable income which has no economic justification, the Committee concluded. The Committee also instituted a progressive oil and gas levy on profits.
The initial rate of the levy is 20%, but it will not be collected before quotient of net cumulative revenues divided by the exploration and development expenses reaches or bypasses 1.5. When this quotient exceeds 2.3, the levy will gradually increase to 50%. Since production from the Tamar field began in 2013, it is projected that the government will only begin collecting revenue from the designated levy in 2018.
In addition, as per income tax calculations, costs that accumulated during the lease stage of the oil-and-gas-asset development will be awarded accelerated depreciation at a rate of 10%. Investments made by the end of 2013 were given a maximum of amount of accelerated depreciation rate of 15%.


Click to expand Source
Click to collapse Source
Click to expand Contact person/organisation
Click to collapse Contact person/organisation
Click to expand Name of collection/source
Click to collapse Name of collection/source

OECD (2018), OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018, Paris.

Click to expand Data Characteristics
Click to collapse Data Characteristics
Click to expand Date last updated
Click to collapse Date last updated

Nov-17

Click to expand Periodicity
Click to collapse Periodicity

Annual

Click to expand Power code
Click to collapse Power code
Units
Click to expand Unit of measure used
Click to collapse Unit of measure used

New shekel

Click to expand Concepts & Classifications
Click to collapse Concepts & Classifications
Click to expand Key statistical concept
Click to collapse Key statistical concept

Indicator

PSE: Producer Support Estimate

GSSE: General Services Support Estimate

CSE: Consumer Support Estimate

Stage

EXTRACT: Extraction or mining stage

TRANS: Transportation of fossil fuels (e.g., through pipelines)

REFIN: Refining or processing stage

GENER: Use of fossil fuels in ectricity generation

INDUS: Use of fossil fuels in the industrial sector

END: Other end uses of fossil fuels

Statutory or Formal Incidence

consumption: Direct consumption

returns: Output Returns

income: Enterprise Income

inputs: Cost of Intermediate Inputs

labour: Labour

land: Land and natural resources

capital: Capital

knowledge: Knowledge

Click to expand Other Aspects
Click to collapse Other Aspects
Click to expand Other comments
Click to collapse Other comments
Click to expand Recommended uses and limitations
Click to collapse Recommended uses and limitations

Users of tax expenditure estimates should bear in mind that the Inventory records tax expenditures as estimates of revenue that is foregone due to a particular feature of the tax system that reduces or postpones tax relative to a jurisdiction’s benchmark tax system, to the benefit of fossil fuels. Hence, (i) tax expenditure estimates could increase either because of greater concessions, relative to the benchmark tax treatment, or because of a raise in the benchmark itself; (ii) international comparison of tax expenditures could be misleading, due to country-specific benchmark tax treatments.

Fossil Fuel Support - ISRAbstract

ISRAEL: GENERAL METADATA
Data documentation
General notes
Israel’s fiscal year coincides with the calendar year.
Producer Support Estimate
The oil and gas industry in Israel is regulated by a system of fees, royalty payments and tax deductions developed in the 1950s. The fiscal provisions that are unique to the oil and gas industry are the Oil Law (1952), Oil Regulations (1953), Income Tax Ordinance (1961) and some parts of the income tax legislation, especially the Deductions from the Income of Holders of Oil Rights (1956) and the Rules for Calculating Tax for the Holding and Sale of Participation Units in an Oil Exploration Partnership (1988).
Israel started producing natural gas in 2004. As this is a relatively recent development, the issues of producer taxation and royalty payments are currently under review by the government (Knesset), the Ministry of Finance and participants representing the civil society. In April 2010, the Minister of Finance appointed a committee to examine the fiscal framework for the oil and gas resources in Israel, headed by Professor Eytan Sheshinski. The Sheshinski Committee submitted its final conclusions in January 2011. It recommended that the 12.5% rate of royalty payments should remain unchanged since increasing it could have a negative impact on the development of relatively less profitable gas fields. The depletion deduction, however, should be cancelled as it leads to a considerable reduction of the amount of taxable income which has no economic justification, the Committee concluded. The Committee also instituted a progressive oil and gas levy on profits.
The initial rate of the levy is 20%, but it will not be collected before quotient of net cumulative revenues divided by the exploration and development expenses reaches or bypasses 1.5. When this quotient exceeds 2.3, the levy will gradually increase to 50%. Since production from the Tamar field began in 2013, it is projected that the government will only begin collecting revenue from the designated levy in 2018.
In addition, as per income tax calculations, costs that accumulated during the lease stage of the oil-and-gas-asset development will be awarded accelerated depreciation at a rate of 10%. Investments made by the end of 2013 were given a maximum of amount of accelerated depreciation rate of 15%.


Country notehttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=d287dcde-4d7e-42b7-ad8f-a658642f3a40Country sourceshttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=5560b8dd-3fd1-4681-a2a0-d13e6c4418e0
Contact person/organisation

ffs.contact@oecd.orgffs.contact@oecd.orgName of collection/source

OECD (2018), OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018, Paris.

Unit of measure used

New shekel

Power codeUnitsPeriodicity

Annual

Date last updated

Nov-17

Key statistical concept

Indicator

PSE: Producer Support Estimate

GSSE: General Services Support Estimate

CSE: Consumer Support Estimate

Stage

EXTRACT: Extraction or mining stage

TRANS: Transportation of fossil fuels (e.g., through pipelines)

REFIN: Refining or processing stage

GENER: Use of fossil fuels in ectricity generation

INDUS: Use of fossil fuels in the industrial sector

END: Other end uses of fossil fuels

Statutory or Formal Incidence

consumption: Direct consumption

returns: Output Returns

income: Enterprise Income

inputs: Cost of Intermediate Inputs

labour: Labour

land: Land and natural resources

capital: Capital

knowledge: Knowledge

Recommended uses and limitations

Users of tax expenditure estimates should bear in mind that the Inventory records tax expenditures as estimates of revenue that is foregone due to a particular feature of the tax system that reduces or postpones tax relative to a jurisdiction’s benchmark tax system, to the benefit of fossil fuels. Hence, (i) tax expenditure estimates could increase either because of greater concessions, relative to the benchmark tax treatment, or because of a raise in the benchmark itself; (ii) international comparison of tax expenditures could be misleading, due to country-specific benchmark tax treatments.

Other comments

OECD Companion to the Inventory of Support Measures for Fossil Fuels 2018http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264286061-en