Mineral and Energy Resources
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OECD statistics contact: stat.contact@oecd.org
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16 January 2019

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14 commodities were selected based on their economic and environmental significance. They are listed below:
Crude oil (billion barrels)
Natural gas (billion cubic metres)
Hard coal (billion tonnes)
Brown coal (billion tonnes)
Iron-Ore (billion tonnes)
Bauxite (billion tonnes)
Copper (million tonnes)
Tin (thousand tonnes)
Zinc (million tonnes)
Lead (million tonnes)
Nickel (million tonnes)
Gold (tonnes)
Silver (thousand tonnes)
Phosphate (million tonnes)

7 OECD countries possessing a significant share of these key commodities and for which data and metadata were available have been included in the database so far: Australia, Canada, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, the United Kingdom and the United States.

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Mineral and Energy ResourcesContact person/organisation
OECD statistics contact: stat.contact@oecd.org
Date last input received

16 January 2019

Population coverage

14 commodities were selected based on their economic and environmental significance. They are listed below:
Crude oil (billion barrels)
Natural gas (billion cubic metres)
Hard coal (billion tonnes)
Brown coal (billion tonnes)
Iron-Ore (billion tonnes)
Bauxite (billion tonnes)
Copper (million tonnes)
Tin (thousand tonnes)
Zinc (million tonnes)
Lead (million tonnes)
Nickel (million tonnes)
Gold (tonnes)
Silver (thousand tonnes)
Phosphate (million tonnes)

7 OECD countries possessing a significant share of these key commodities and for which data and metadata were available have been included in the database so far: Australia, Canada, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Key statistical concept

 

Mineral and energy resources are one of the seven environmental assets considered in the System of Environmental Economic Accounting (SEEA, 2012). They are non-renewable resources which cannot be regenerated over a human timescale in spite of their prominent role in sustaining economic activities. From an economic, environmental and supply security perspective, it is therefore important to gather harmonised data on their rate of extraction and current availability.

Stocks and flows for each commodity are compiled in physical units and three classes of resources are distinguished, as advocated by the SEEA (2012): commercially recoverable resources (Class A), potentially commercially recoverable resources (Class B) and non-commercial and other known deposits (Class C). The definition of these classes is based on the United Nations Framework Classification for Fossil Energy and Mineral Reserves and Resources (UNFC 2009) which, in turn, can be related to two other major classification systems: CRIRSCO for mineral resources and SPE-PRMS for energy resources. A detailed mapping between the classifications used by countries and the SEEA-2012 classification into three classes (A, B and C) is available in the following Excel file: http://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=c7f5f4ad-9b66-4b8c-a8b9-7a6775bd2a28