<br />Indicator: Financial net worth of households per capita, at current PPPs, millions US dollars
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In this dataset, almost all OECD countries compile their data according to 2008 System of National Account (SNA).

The link to the file "ANA_changes.xls" is available for users to provide more information on where OECD countries and non member countries stand regarding the change over the 2008 SNA.

The readers' guide gives general information on the dataset and withheld criteria for this dataset.

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The financial net worth, or net wealth, of households corresponds to the excess of financial assets over liabilities and can provide an important source of revenue on its own. When net wealth increases due to, for example, a rise in share prices, households feel richer and are more inclined to save less and spend more. It is wealth in the form of securities and shares that are most sensitive to these capital gains, or "holding gains". As such, the financial net wealth of households plays an important role in economic analyses, such as studies of asset bubbles and analyses of welfare.

Financial wealth makes up an important part of a household's economic resources, and can protect from economic hardship and vulnerability. For example, a low-income household having above-average wealth will be better off than a low-income household with no wealth at all.

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Definition

The household financial net worth is the balancing item of their financial balance sheet, i.e. total financial assets minus total liabilities, recorded at current market values. The change in financial net worth between two consecutive years is not only due to financial transactions over the period, but also to price changes (i.e. holding gains or losses) in financial assets and liabilities. 

The following financial assets and liabilities are included, whenever available/applicable for households: monetary gold and SDRs, currency and deposits; debt securities; loans; equity and investment fund shares/units; insurance, pensions and standardised guarantees; financial derivatives and employees stock options, and other accounts receivable/payable.

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The indicator is calculated as the ratio of financial net worth of households divided by population of the country, in US dollars at current PPPs. See "reader's guide", Purchasing Power Parities for GDP and for actual individual consumption.

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<br />Indicator: Financial net worth of households per capita, at current PPPs, millions US dollarsContact person/organisation

In this dataset, almost all OECD countries compile their data according to 2008 System of National Account (SNA).

The link to the file "ANA_changes.xls" is available for users to provide more information on where OECD countries and non member countries stand regarding the change over the 2008 SNA.

The readers' guide gives general information on the dataset and withheld criteria for this dataset.

Readers'guidehttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=0f8a2aaf-ede2-450f-bcd7-5c64c251a50d ANA_changes.xlshttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=a93cfcc9-df92-4d84-be64-58fd6d788737 Other data characteristics

The financial net worth, or net wealth, of households corresponds to the excess of financial assets over liabilities and can provide an important source of revenue on its own. When net wealth increases due to, for example, a rise in share prices, households feel richer and are more inclined to save less and spend more. It is wealth in the form of securities and shares that are most sensitive to these capital gains, or "holding gains". As such, the financial net wealth of households plays an important role in economic analyses, such as studies of asset bubbles and analyses of welfare.

Financial wealth makes up an important part of a household's economic resources, and can protect from economic hardship and vulnerability. For example, a low-income household having above-average wealth will be better off than a low-income household with no wealth at all.

Key statistical concept

Definition

The household financial net worth is the balancing item of their financial balance sheet, i.e. total financial assets minus total liabilities, recorded at current market values. The change in financial net worth between two consecutive years is not only due to financial transactions over the period, but also to price changes (i.e. holding gains or losses) in financial assets and liabilities. 

The following financial assets and liabilities are included, whenever available/applicable for households: monetary gold and SDRs, currency and deposits; debt securities; loans; equity and investment fund shares/units; insurance, pensions and standardised guarantees; financial derivatives and employees stock options, and other accounts receivable/payable.

Other manipulations

The indicator is calculated as the ratio of financial net worth of households divided by population of the country, in US dollars at current PPPs. See "reader's guide", Purchasing Power Parities for GDP and for actual individual consumption.

Recommended uses and limitations

Comparability

Whereas comparability is quite good, it can be hampered by differences in the organisation of pension systems and in the relative importance of the schemes that are included in (or excluded from) the core financial accounts.  The 2008 SNA recognised that the exclusion of social security pensions from the core accounts distorts international comparisons, and recommends that all countries complete a supplementary table including entitlements from social security pensions (see DBTS13GDP, General government debt-to-GDP).

The holding of personal life insurance (which is part of the third pension pillar, voluntary retirement savings) can be influenced by the availability of public and employment-related pensions (first and second pillars), which differs considerably across countries.

<Body /><Link><Title>2008 SNAhttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=62f21fca-6a46-4460-b2d7-00d40d59f18dBibliographyhttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=13c0f8d7-28cf-463b-a443-6d11290b4756