Metropolitan areas
< < >-< OECD.Stat
Open all groups and itemsClose all groups and itemsSend link via emailPrintOpen in stand alone windowClose this window
Click to expand Database Specific
Click to collapse Database Specific
Click to expand Source
Click to collapse Source
Click to expand Contact person/organisation
Click to collapse Contact person/organisation

For any question or comment, please write to: RegionStat@oecd.org

Click to expand Name of collection/source
Click to collapse Name of collection/source

City cores are defined through gridded population data. The geographic building blocks to define functional urban areas are the municipalities (LAU2 in Eurostat terminology and the smaller administrative units for which national commuting data are available in non-European countries). The population grid data for European countries comes from Global Human Settlement Population Grid, produced by the Joint Research Centre for the European Environmental Agency (EEA). A “city core” consists of a high-density cluster of contiguous grid cells of 1 km2 with a density of at least 1,500 inhabitants per km2. A municipality is defined as being part of an urban core if at least 50% of the population of the municipality lives within the urban cluster. If more than 15% of employed persons living in one city core work in another city core, these two city cores are combined into a single destination (to take into account policentricity). Commuting zones are defined as all municipalities with at least 15% of their employed residents working in a certain city core. Municipalities surrounded by a single functional urban area are included and non-contiguous municipalities are dropped. This methodology makes it possible to compare functional urban areas of similar size across countries.

Click to expand Date last input received
Click to collapse Date last input received

Latest update: January 2019.

Click to expand Source metadata
Click to collapse Source metadata

Metropolitan statistics can be further explored and analysed with the interactive OECD Metropolitan eXplorer. To visualise the performance of cities on maps, and compare the difference between functional and administrative borders, select the link:

Metropolitan areasAbstract

The OECD, in cooperation with the EU, has developed a harmonised definition of urban areas which overcomes previous limitations linked to administrative definitions (OECD, 2012). According to this definition an urban area is a functional economic unit characterised by densely inhabited “city core” and “commuting zone” whose labour market is highly integrated with the core. The Metropolitan database provides indicators of 649 OECD metropolitan areas identified in 33 OECD countries and the functional urban areas of Colombia. Comparable values of population, GDP, employment, and other indicators are presented.

Redefining Urban: a new way to measure metropolitan areas, OECD, Paris.http://www.oecd.org/regional/regional-policy/redefining-urban-9789264174108-en.htm
Contact person/organisation

For any question or comment, please write to: RegionStat@oecd.org

Name of collection/source

City cores are defined through gridded population data. The geographic building blocks to define functional urban areas are the municipalities (LAU2 in Eurostat terminology and the smaller administrative units for which national commuting data are available in non-European countries). The population grid data for European countries comes from Global Human Settlement Population Grid, produced by the Joint Research Centre for the European Environmental Agency (EEA). A “city core” consists of a high-density cluster of contiguous grid cells of 1 km2 with a density of at least 1,500 inhabitants per km2. A municipality is defined as being part of an urban core if at least 50% of the population of the municipality lives within the urban cluster. If more than 15% of employed persons living in one city core work in another city core, these two city cores are combined into a single destination (to take into account policentricity). Commuting zones are defined as all municipalities with at least 15% of their employed residents working in a certain city core. Municipalities surrounded by a single functional urban area are included and non-contiguous municipalities are dropped. This methodology makes it possible to compare functional urban areas of similar size across countries.

Source metadata

Metropolitan statistics can be further explored and analysed with the interactive OECD Metropolitan eXplorer. To visualise the performance of cities on maps, and compare the difference between functional and administrative borders, select the link:

Metropolitan eXplorerhttp://measuringurban.oecd.org
Date last input received

Latest update: January 2019.