Fisheries Support Estimate
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OECD statistics contact: TAD.contact@oecd.org

Click to expand Name of collection/source
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The FSE data collection is part of the more comprehensive data gathering carried out on an annual basis by the Fisheries Committee (COFI) of the Trade and Agriculture Directorate (TAD) from OECD members and participating non-OECD economies.

Data on landings, aquaculture production, inland fisheries catch, fleet, employment, total allowable catch (TAC) and fisheries support estimate (FSE) are collected from Fisheries Ministries, National Statistics Offices and other institutions designated as an official data source. The surveys used for this exercise are the OECD Fisheries questionnaires.

Click to expand Date last input received
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The OECD Fisheries questionnaires are sent in March(y) asking for (y-1) data, and data are disseminated in December(y). (y-1) data provided are usually provisional.

Click to expand Direct source
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Data are directly sourced from the OECD Fisheries questionnaires addressed to Fisheries Ministries, National Statistics Offices and other institutions designated as an official data source.

Click to expand Source Periodicity
Click to collapse Source Periodicity

The OECD Fisheries questionnaires are sent annually.

Click to expand Data source(s) used
Click to collapse Data source(s) used

FSE statistics are mainly compiled using administrative data from government agencies budgets on programmes and policies supporting fishers as individual entrepreneurs, and collectively (i.e. as a sector).

Click to expand Data Characteristics
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Click to expand Other data characteristics
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Click to expand Periodicity
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The data provided by countries and disseminated by OECD are annual data.

Click to expand Reference period
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The annual time unit normally used in fisheries statistics is the calendar or civil year, i.e., the period between 1 January and 31 December. For exceptions, please see the individual notes.

Click to expand Unit of measure used
Click to collapse Unit of measure used

The original financial data is collected in national currency at current values.

For analytical purposes and data comparisons, data are converted and published in US dollars.

Exchange rates are average yearly spot rates, taken from the dataset OECD Economic Outlook: Statistics and Projections.

Data reported in this dataset are expressed in units of national currency and US dollars.

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Click to expand Concepts & Classifications
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Click to expand Classification(s) used
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Data presented in this dataset are compiled in accordance with the classification presented in the FSE Manual.

Policy measures in the FSE Manual are classified according to implementation criteria, after the initial distinction between budgetary and non-budgetary measures. For a given policy measure, the implementation criteria are defined as the conditions under which the associated transfers are provided to fishers, or the conditions of eligibility for the payment.

The first major implementation criterion is whether a transfer is directed at fishers individually (TIF: Transfers to Individual Fishers) or collectively (GSSE: General Services Support Estimate).

Transfers to Individual Fishers (TIF) are received by fishers in their capacity as fishers (i.e. payments based on income such as disaster payments), or they become eligible for benefits under a programme by virtue of actions they take (i.e. purchase of inputs such as fuel or gear, purchase or sale of capital such as vessels or equipment, or entering or leaving the fishery). Also important are whether policies provide incentives to reduce fishing activity, so payments based on reduction of capacity have separate category.

The transfers in the General Services Support Estimate (GSSE) are government expenditures to provide services to fisheries generally, and include policies for which fishers are the main beneficiaries. GSSE transfers are not destined to individual fishers, and do not directly affect their revenue, although they likely have an indirect impact on investment, revenue and activity. The main GSSE categories cover provision of infrastructure, management, and capacity building for fishers and the fisheries sector.

Many of the policies reported under the first two major categories of the FSE dataset (TIF and GSSE) are subject to some form of cost sharing or cost recovery from fishers that benefit from them. In keeping with the gross transfer definition of the FSE, these charges, fees or other forms of payment from fishers to the government are not deducted directly from the corresponding policy but are identified separately in a third category: Cost recovery Charges (FCRC). There are five different cost-recovery categories, covering mainly fishing access, infrastructure and management.

Click to expand Key statistical concept
Click to collapse Key statistical concept

The FSE dataset provides a summary of governments' policies support to fisheries.

A policy measure is included in the dataset if it benefits fishers, individually or collectively. Effectively, fisheries policies may provide direct payments to fishers, or they may support the sector in general through management, harbours and other infrastructure.

Support is understood as transfer from domestic governments to domestic fishers, arising from governments' policies, and may be budgetary or non-budgetary in nature, such as tax measures.

The common element to all these policies is that they generate a transfer. The transfers may be explicit (a cheque) or implicit (as in a tax concession). The concept of transfer presumes both a source of the transfer and the existence of a recipient. In the present method, fishers are the recipient of policy transfers and taxpayers are the source, i.e. the group bearing the cost of fisheries support. As recipients of policy transfers, fishers are viewed from two perspectives – as individual entrepreneurs, and collectively (i.e. as a sector); the term “fisheries” designates fishers as an economic group.

Transfers generated by fisheries policies are measured in gross terms, i.e. no adjustment is made for costs incurred by fishers in order to receive the support. Policy measures are classified according to the implementation criteria, such as the basis upon which the support is provided (e.g. the use of inputs or fixed capital) or whether production is required to receive support.

The policy measures applied in a country within a certain period of time are brought together in the FSE dataset and expressed in one or several simple numbers - called support indicators - which are comparable across time and between countries. These indicators reflect the provision of the support, and they are not intended to and do not measure the impact of the policy effort.

Data presented in this dataset are compiled in accordance with the FSE Manual. This manual is still not finalized, and the version attached is the draft presented at the 117th session of Committee of Fisheries (COFI).

Click to expand Dissemination format(s)
Click to collapse Dissemination format(s)

FSE data are disseminated on-line in the 'Fisheries and Aquaculture statistics' domain of OECD.Stat and in the biennial paper publication 'OECD Review of Fisheries, Policies and Summary Statistics'

Click to expand Other Aspects
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Click to expand Quality comments
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FSE data collection is slowly moving from a pilot phase to regular systematic reporting; the indicators should be interpreted with caution due to the difficulties in allocating (and estimating) national policies into a consistent international framework.

Fisheries support is intrinsically linked to the domestic context; comparing countries is challenging, as well as finding a common baseline.

At present old, missing and poorly understood data make it hard to evaluate the consistency and the comparability of the information provided.

Click to expand Recommended uses and limitations
Click to collapse Recommended uses and limitations

FSE data are designed to monitor and quantify developments in fisheries policy, to establish a common basis for policy dialogue among countries, and to provide economic data to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of policies.

They can be used for policy evaluation and modelling and they reflect the provision of the support, but they are not intended to and do not measure the impact of the policy effort.

Fisheries Support EstimateAbstract

The OECD FSE database is intended to be the best source of information on fisheries policies in OECD members and participating non-OECD economies.

It is designed to monitor and quantify developments in fisheries policy, to establish a common basis for policy dialogue among countries, and to provide economic data to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of policies.

These tables report country programmes data aggregated according to the main categories presented in the FSE Manual.

More detailed documentation on country programmes can be found in country-level metadata; more data on country programmes can be found in the full dataset (Excel Format - link provided below). Statistics are organized in pivot tables to make possible cross-country comparisons and to filter disaggregated policy-level data by policy implementation criteria and country.

Full datasethttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=33f7a676-4345-414e-907e-9c0c0726ddc4
Contact person/organisation

OECD statistics contact: TAD.contact@oecd.org

Data source(s) used

FSE statistics are mainly compiled using administrative data from government agencies budgets on programmes and policies supporting fishers as individual entrepreneurs, and collectively (i.e. as a sector).

Name of collection/source

The FSE data collection is part of the more comprehensive data gathering carried out on an annual basis by the Fisheries Committee (COFI) of the Trade and Agriculture Directorate (TAD) from OECD members and participating non-OECD economies.

Data on landings, aquaculture production, inland fisheries catch, fleet, employment, total allowable catch (TAC) and fisheries support estimate (FSE) are collected from Fisheries Ministries, National Statistics Offices and other institutions designated as an official data source. The surveys used for this exercise are the OECD Fisheries questionnaires.

Direct source

Data are directly sourced from the OECD Fisheries questionnaires addressed to Fisheries Ministries, National Statistics Offices and other institutions designated as an official data source.

Source Periodicity

The OECD Fisheries questionnaires are sent annually.

Date last input received

The OECD Fisheries questionnaires are sent in March(y) asking for (y-1) data, and data are disseminated in December(y). (y-1) data provided are usually provisional.

Unit of measure used

The original financial data is collected in national currency at current values.

For analytical purposes and data comparisons, data are converted and published in US dollars.

Exchange rates are average yearly spot rates, taken from the dataset OECD Economic Outlook: Statistics and Projections.

Data reported in this dataset are expressed in units of national currency and US dollars.

OECD Economic Outlookhttp://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/economics/data/oecd-economic-outlook-statistics-and-projections_eo-data-en
Periodicity

The data provided by countries and disseminated by OECD are annual data.

Reference period

The annual time unit normally used in fisheries statistics is the calendar or civil year, i.e., the period between 1 January and 31 December. For exceptions, please see the individual notes.

Other data characteristics

Standard ISO 3-alpha codes are used for countries and currencies.

International Organization for Standardizationhttp://www.iso.org/iso/home.html
Statistical population

The statistical population is the set of countries participating in the work of the COFI, i.e.OECD members, excluding land-lock countries, with some exceptions (Czech Republic and Slovakia are included, Israel is not).

The group includes also the following partner countries: Argentina, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Lithuania, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation and Thailand.

In order to facilitate analysis and comparisons over time, historical data for OECD members have been provided over as long a period as possible, often even before a country became a member of the Organisation.

Information on the membership dates of all OECD countries can be found at OECD Ratification Dates.

OECD Ratification Dateshttp://www.oecd.org/about/membersandpartners/list-oecd-member-countries.htm
Key statistical concept

The FSE dataset provides a summary of governments' policies support to fisheries.

A policy measure is included in the dataset if it benefits fishers, individually or collectively. Effectively, fisheries policies may provide direct payments to fishers, or they may support the sector in general through management, harbours and other infrastructure.

Support is understood as transfer from domestic governments to domestic fishers, arising from governments' policies, and may be budgetary or non-budgetary in nature, such as tax measures.

The common element to all these policies is that they generate a transfer. The transfers may be explicit (a cheque) or implicit (as in a tax concession). The concept of transfer presumes both a source of the transfer and the existence of a recipient. In the present method, fishers are the recipient of policy transfers and taxpayers are the source, i.e. the group bearing the cost of fisheries support. As recipients of policy transfers, fishers are viewed from two perspectives – as individual entrepreneurs, and collectively (i.e. as a sector); the term “fisheries” designates fishers as an economic group.

Transfers generated by fisheries policies are measured in gross terms, i.e. no adjustment is made for costs incurred by fishers in order to receive the support. Policy measures are classified according to the implementation criteria, such as the basis upon which the support is provided (e.g. the use of inputs or fixed capital) or whether production is required to receive support.

The policy measures applied in a country within a certain period of time are brought together in the FSE dataset and expressed in one or several simple numbers - called support indicators - which are comparable across time and between countries. These indicators reflect the provision of the support, and they are not intended to and do not measure the impact of the policy effort.

Data presented in this dataset are compiled in accordance with the FSE Manual. This manual is still not finalized, and the version attached is the draft presented at the 117th session of Committee of Fisheries (COFI).

FSE Manualhttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=293f897b-9943-4b42-ac7b-42bc995a4677
Classification(s) used

Data presented in this dataset are compiled in accordance with the classification presented in the FSE Manual.

Policy measures in the FSE Manual are classified according to implementation criteria, after the initial distinction between budgetary and non-budgetary measures. For a given policy measure, the implementation criteria are defined as the conditions under which the associated transfers are provided to fishers, or the conditions of eligibility for the payment.

The first major implementation criterion is whether a transfer is directed at fishers individually (TIF: Transfers to Individual Fishers) or collectively (GSSE: General Services Support Estimate).

Transfers to Individual Fishers (TIF) are received by fishers in their capacity as fishers (i.e. payments based on income such as disaster payments), or they become eligible for benefits under a programme by virtue of actions they take (i.e. purchase of inputs such as fuel or gear, purchase or sale of capital such as vessels or equipment, or entering or leaving the fishery). Also important are whether policies provide incentives to reduce fishing activity, so payments based on reduction of capacity have separate category.

The transfers in the General Services Support Estimate (GSSE) are government expenditures to provide services to fisheries generally, and include policies for which fishers are the main beneficiaries. GSSE transfers are not destined to individual fishers, and do not directly affect their revenue, although they likely have an indirect impact on investment, revenue and activity. The main GSSE categories cover provision of infrastructure, management, and capacity building for fishers and the fisheries sector.

Many of the policies reported under the first two major categories of the FSE dataset (TIF and GSSE) are subject to some form of cost sharing or cost recovery from fishers that benefit from them. In keeping with the gross transfer definition of the FSE, these charges, fees or other forms of payment from fishers to the government are not deducted directly from the corresponding policy but are identified separately in a third category: Cost recovery Charges (FCRC). There are five different cost-recovery categories, covering mainly fishing access, infrastructure and management.

FSE Classificationhttp://stats.oecd.org/wbos/fileview2.aspx?IDFile=68ae34d7-a079-42fa-84c3-6d8e636e20d3
Dissemination format(s)

FSE data are disseminated on-line in the 'Fisheries and Aquaculture statistics' domain of OECD.Stat and in the biennial paper publication 'OECD Review of Fisheries, Policies and Summary Statistics'

Recommended uses and limitations

FSE data are designed to monitor and quantify developments in fisheries policy, to establish a common basis for policy dialogue among countries, and to provide economic data to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of policies.

They can be used for policy evaluation and modelling and they reflect the provision of the support, but they are not intended to and do not measure the impact of the policy effort.

Quality comments

FSE data collection is slowly moving from a pilot phase to regular systematic reporting; the indicators should be interpreted with caution due to the difficulties in allocating (and estimating) national policies into a consistent international framework.

Fisheries support is intrinsically linked to the domestic context; comparing countries is challenging, as well as finding a common baseline.

At present old, missing and poorly understood data make it hard to evaluate the consistency and the comparability of the information provided.